My Life with Depression

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

How to Live with Yourself when You Feel like You Can’t Live with Yourself

Living with depression can make the most easy tasks seem insurmountably difficult. It can be almost impossible to get anything accomplished when you feel like life just is not worth living any more. If you feel this way, and currently have thoughts or have thought about suicide, there are a lot of people out there who want to help you. It is so very important that you know right now that your life is worth living. The most important number you should have is the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 (an easier way to remember is 1-800-273-TALK). There are always people on-call who can assist you when you feel like you have nothing left to live for. They helped me, and they can help you.

One of the most important things to remember when you are dealing with depression is that no matter how lonely you feel in yourself, you are never alone. No matter your situation, whether you live in the middle of a big city or out in the middle of a farm, everyone dealing with depression feels like they are alone in the world. They might feel like they are weird for feeling like they do, and no one can help them. There are mental health professionals that can assist you every step along the way as you learn to live with depression. Local and state health departments can help you find someone, even if you are among the many Americans who are currently living without health insurance, who may offer either free or sliding-scale assistance.

If you are worried that you may need to take medication to help you deal with your depression, don’t worry, because there is a treatment plan for you. You may find yourself with a mental health professional who feels it would be in your best interest to start a medication regimen, but there are many other treatment routes for you to take. When I decided that I wanted help, I made sure to tell my psychologist that I do not want to be on any medications. It took a while, and maybe it would have taken less time if I were to be on medication, but I am now able to live with my depression.

Most importantly, you need to know that you can live with depression. Sometimes it feels like you can’t handle it all, and the clouds won’t go away and the rain won’t stop coming down in your life, but you will be able to weather the storm of depression. You may be like me and live with depression your whole life, but I no longer let it control me. I am in control of my depression, and I am making the best of my life.

  1. Know that your life is worth living. If you ever need help dealing with thoughts of suicide and don’t have any one to turn to, please remember to call 1-800-273-8255 first. There are people that care about you, and they’re only a phone call away. (It’s not a bad idea to keep this number handy, not just for yourself but for others you may know as well)
  2. Find a professional who can help you. You may start seeing a mental health professional and soon find out that they are not what you are looking for. That’s perfectly alright! You have started looking for help already, and finding someone who will help you even more will be easy.
  3. Follow the treatment path they start you on. It may be difficult to imagine that someone wants you to lead a happy, healthy life. How could someone else think you deserve to be happy when you don’t even believe that you deserve that! Well, I have some news for you: You deserve to be able to live a life that isn’t decided by your depression. This is what your mental health professional is helping you do.
  4. Handle the lows and the highs. As you go along with your treatment, you may start to feel more evened-out. Your normal mood may be a level of happiness you are not accustomed to living. You may feel that your mood is elevated to levels you never thought possible before. This may also make the lows feel even lower than before, because you have started digging yourself out of those holes and you feel swallowed up again by them. You are not falling back in to a deeper depression, you are just going through a difficult process of learning to deal with your depression. This is a perfectly normal part of living with depression. Talk with your mental health professional about these feelings.
  5. Live the best life you can. Nothing is going to feel better in your battle with depression than knowing that you no longer are kept down because of it. Every day accomplishments which you didn’t think were possible you can now do without worry. I knew you could do it all along, you just needed some convincing.

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

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