How to Reduce Anxiety Before Your First Driving Test

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Driving can be very stressful, but it can be even more stressful when you have an instructor sitting next to you making sure you are really ready to have a license so you can drive on your own. Taking a driving test is something nobody really wants to do, it’s just a test they have to take so they can become more independent and can go places without asking their parents to take them where they need to go.

If your a teen that is getting ready to take a driving test, of course you are nervous.. This is normal for everyone who is about to take a big test. But you don’t want to your nervousness to get in the way of your driving so much that it could make you fail. If you are feeling that you may have too much anxiety to take the test and pass, than here are some things you can do to reduce your stress.

Practice.
You’ve had your practice, but you can never have too much practice when it comes to something like driving. Before your test you should have ask your parents to take you out driving as much as they possibly can so you can get in a lot of practice before the test.

Study.
Read books and watch videos on driving. This way you can know a lot of the answers on the written test and you’ll know what you are supposed to do when driving in certain places. Studying is one of the most important things you can do, you never know if your instructor is going to ask you questions while you’re driving and you want to know how to answer so they think you know what you’re doing.

Try to stay relaxed.
Breath deeply and picture yourself doing well during your driving test. Your palms might get sweaty along with the rest of your body, and you may feel a knot in your stomach but if you do your best to stay calm, breath and not be so tense than you’ll lessen the pressure that you are putting on yourself.

Don’t worry about the instructor.
Yes, you’ll have an instructor sitting there critiquing every move you make but it’s important that you try to not think about what they are writing down and thinking. Just do your best and try to stay focused on your driving, not what the instructor is doing.

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

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