Choice Therapy: How to Resolve Pleasure Deficient Depression

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

As an individual who suffers from mental health complications, such as depression, anxiety or even a phobia, it is important to seek out the appropriate psychiatric healthcare to ensure you are given every opportunity for normal and healthy living.

For some individuals, however, it is believed that the mental health complications are not those that can be resolved by a mental health professional and, instead, must be worked out through choice and action by the individual’s own will. While there was once an increase in individual’s who chose to believe they were depressed, today, we find, these same individuals may not really be unhappy or clinically depressed but, instead, simply sad over a lack of pleasure stimulation in their lives.

To be clinically depressed, there must be a chemical alteration within the body that leads to symptoms such as sadness, lack of motivation and interest and an impaired ability to function on a daily basis. This is far different from those who are “depressed” over a lack of excitement or pleasure in their lives. For this latter group, symptoms of depression may be present but are usually not related to a chemical imbalance and, instead, are related to the loss of a pleasure activity, such as the thrill of skipping out from work and relaxing at home all day, the inability to enjoy leisurely activities, such as gambling or consuming alcohol, or even the inability to go shopping. Again, the symptoms exhibited when these pleasure items are removed from your life do not, generally, produce depression or other mental health complications and, instead, may simply result in your choice to be unhappy due to the removal of a pleasure activity.

With this realization, many mental health professionals are now looking at the treatment offered their clients and, instead of prescribing anti-depressants and traditional psychotherapy, if the client demonstrates complications associated with simple loss of pleasure, the counselor will now offer a different approach to treatment known as “choice therapy”.

When entering into “choice therapy”, many clients are, initially, surprised to learn that they are not clinically depressed. As they progress through the therapy, the client is taught to recognize that every event and emotion is based on a choice the client makes in response to a particular event. In “choice therapy” the client is taught that, while we can not control every event in our lives, we can control how we respond. We also can not control how other individuals act or behave and the client is taught that he, or she, does not know what is right for everyone else. Through this three prong approach to therapy, many clients are surprised that the application of choice therapy is more easily applied to their lives than they realized and, ultimately, leads to a better quality of life.

Applying “choice therapy”, therefore, to the absence of pleasure activity is achieved by teaching the client to make a choice to enjoy life and enjoy the happiness in other activities, such as spending time with family and friends. Choosing to be unhappy over the loss of a pleasure stimulating activity is not, clinically speaking, a case of depression and can, in most cases, be treated with a change in thought process.

If you suffer from mental health complications especially that associated with a perceived sense of depression ask yourself if the depression is possibly induced by a loss of pleasure stimulation in your life. If so, consult a mental health professional regarding the use of “choice therapy” to teach you the life skills required to find happiness in your life without pleasure.

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Leave a Reply