Supporting someone who is empty inside because of complicated grief

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Supporting someone who is empty inside because of complicated grief

There is nothing certain in the world save for death and taxes. Death comes to us all, and we have all been affected by it. The loss of a spouse, parent or child can have a profoundly crippling effect on us both mentally and emotionally.

Oftentimes people do not want to admit to themselves just how much grief and pain they are experiencing. They take it as a sign of weakness or worse, they are afraid that it might be indicative of something deeper, more sinister, more malignant.

However, studies have shown that where the grieving process is delayed or inhibited altogether this substantially elevates the risk of what is known as complicated grief (also known as unresolved grief).

Let them open and find the root cause

Things to Do When You

People who are experiencing complicated grief cannot comprehend on any meaningful level that their loved one has passed away. They experience the sensation of being empty inside and yet shrug it off. Why? Because to recognize the root cause would be open themselves to further pain and torment.

When a person has complicated grief the name of the deceased person becomes a taboo and an ugly word. Rather than focusing on the happy, positive times and memories that they shared with the person who died; such memories actually cause them distress.

People with complicated grief then compound the feeling of being empty inside by erroneously assuming that they are being self-indulgent and wallowing in self-pity. Nothing could be further from the truth. If our stomach grumbles, we know we need to eat some food. When we are sweaty and clammy, we know we are too warm and must reduce our temperature.

Complicated grief is complicated and can pose a challenge to properly and effectively remedy. Therefore, anyone who is experiencing feeling empty inside because of unresolved grief must ensure that they establish close ties with their doctor as well as their friends and family.

If you are the friend or relative of someone with complicated grief, make a conscious effort to involve them more frequently and visibly with your life. Invite them for dinner, or to enjoy in some communal activity.

The more time they spend around other people, away from the mental mausoleum they have erected for themselves the more progress they will make to distance themselves from feeling empty inside.

From there, in time, they will have a much healthier outlook on life in general and more specifically; a healthier relationship with the deceased person.

 

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor nor do I claim to be one. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, are injured, or are feeling thoughts of depression, anxiety, or anything else, please contact a medical professional IMMEDIATELY!

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

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